Friday, 4 August 2017

Malachite Ring DONE

A Very Patient Customer 

I'm stunned to see how long ago I first sketched up ideas for our friend's oval malachite. Seems many things got in the way, not least of all the experiments to see if I could make the setting work as she and I wanted it.

Her are some of the photos I took as work progressed. My blog of June 16 shows much of the process as I worked with an agate as a "stand-in". I didn't want to be playing much with the malachite because it is such a very soft stone.

Measuring Matters


A good, super accurate ruler and a variety of calipers are essential tools. I use this divider caliper to transfer measurements from the ruler to a sheet of silver (or a length of silver wire). I also have a digital caliper to measure things like stones — you can't create a setting unless you have a very accurate measurement of the stone in question.




Circles Are Easy, Ovals Are Tough


When you make a bezel for a round stone, the process is pretty easy. Shape your fine silver strip around the stone, mark the point of overlap, cut it clean up ends, solder shut and round up on a bezel mandrel. For this oval, it's the same but you can't round it up at the end. I used this small anvil and a brass hammer to carefully shape the ends of the oval until the bezel was a good fit for the stone.

Once that was done, I soldered the bezel to a back plate.


File to Fit

Here I have the stone in place to be sure everything fits before using that file to carefully remove excess material from the outside of the bezel's backplate.

I also opened up that plate by sawing an oval that came close to the inside edges of the bezel. This unusual stone is slightly domed on both sides and I wanted it to settle smoothly into the plate. Details, details. ;-)

A Ring of Many Parts — Four Parts, To Be Precise


This ring (like the agate I posted earlier) is made in two layers. Here you see the outer one ready to be soldered to the finished inner one. For the details on how those parts are assembled, see my June 16 post below.

Here, beside the parts for the ring shank are the completed bezel and the bright green star of the show. A note about malachite; it is not only soft, it is also loaded with traces of copper (hence that bright green). Copper dust is toxic. Lacking professional lapidary equipment, I could not really polish it so I used the less scratched side of the stone as the top. A piece of soft leather allowed for a gentle buffing.

Whew - It Fits



First, I finished soldering the two layers of the ring, leaving only the ends of the outer layer free to help capture the malachite. Next, I soldered the finished setting into place. It was sure nice to see that stone slip into the setting after I pulled it out of the pickle.

Polish First, Set Last


You never want to do the serious polishing with a stone in place (what it a tool slips?????).

I used a series of 3M polishing discs on my rotary tool to polish the shank and setting. You need at least five discs, of decreasing grit size, to make a good job of it.

You can also see my steel burnisher and a small bit of leather standing by. The stone is still waiting patiently for its starring moment.



Protect It to Set It


After using the burnisher to shape the bezel on to and over the stone. I had to hammer set the side pieces. To protect the finish on the silver — and the stone — I used a piece of leather between the hammer and the item.

It took a bit of time. Lots of tap, tap, tap, first on one side, then on the other. I held the ring in one of my bench vices — the one with the rubber jaw covers. I'm sure glad I bought that long ago as I haven't seen one like it for years.


The End of the Story

Today, my very patient friend came to pick up her ring. All was well until she tried it on. Oh, oh, a touch too tight. No problem, we took it out to the shop where I put it on the steel mandrel and tapped it with my rawhide hammer until it stretched just that little bit she needed.

To see the finished ring, go to <dixsterling> on Instagram. I know, why didn't I take a photo for here? I will just plead heat stroke ;-)