Sunday, 6 August 2017

The Reluctant Gardener,

Or "I'd Rather Pound Silver Than Pull Weeds"

Once upon a time, as a young couple raising two children, we wanted to give them a rural environment. We succeeded: two acres of land, a Victorian farmhouse, horses, chickens, dogs, cats — the whole deal.

"The Farm"




Of course, the rural lifestyle included a big vegetable garden. I grew tons of vegetables and froze or canned a lot. I even owned a book titled "Putting Food By" which included a ton of information. Heck, if the property had included a root cellar, I had instructions on how to put it to use!

At the time, I loved it. Then kids grew up and left home. I "went back to work" and tending to 13 rooms plus lawns, swimming pool, and a garden lost its appeal. We parted with that "the farm" and built a floating home. I was delighted to reduce my gardening to a couple of planters, two potted tomato plants and a few hanging baskets. Freedom. I found I did not miss the garden —at all.



More years and more changing circumstances forced us to abandon ship so to speak. We bought a pleasant, one story home. Only five steps to reach the porch (great for my darling's bad knees), a covered carport (great for auto finishes), and a good size workshop (great for my jewelry bench). The small bit of lawn is easy to mow and I still have just a couple of hanging baskets. But there is one problem. This home came with a 9 by 10 foot vegetable garden. If I just ignore it (as I am tempted to do) we — and our neighbours — have a great view of a weed patch.

For the first couple of summers, lured by the promise of fresh veggies, I went at it with a fair amount of enthusiasm. This summer, I no longer feel so gung-ho. Here are some photos of Dix's garden 2017. About half is just bare dirt (bare dirt is at least easy to weed).

 Herbs are wonderful to have (although they were much easier to grow in a pot by the boat deck).

This year's weird weather has been troublesome. My thyme survived a very cold (for here) winter but is a bit straggly. The basil, planted in June, is flourishing but the rosemary and parsley are, at best, reluctant.


Last year's beefsteak tomatoes were not all that satisfactory. This time, in light of our very cool, wet spring, I had to plant late, so opted for three kinds of cherry tomatoes. The plants were only about six inches when they went in in mid-June.

They are growing pretty well but, as of August 6, our total harvest has been about eight! I see number nine just ripening in the center of this photo. There are lots on the plants so, unless it gets too cool too soon in September, there is hope.

Mrs. McGregor and the Rabbits

We live in one of those neighbourhoods where unwanted pet rabbits have been set free. There are a lot of bunnies around here. They are very cute but they sure mow a garden. They have an unexpected passion for green onions. Apparently, rabbits do not mind bad breath. I tried fencing one year but it seemed to mostly give protection to weeds around the edge without totally banning bunnies. Blessings upon the internet. Last year, I found this solution posted somewhere. Yes, those are plastic forks. Now my garden looks very odd but the beets and carrots have a fighting chance!



Glorious Glads Gone Wild




Several years ago, I planted a dozen gladiola corms so I would have cut flowers for the house. I neglected to pull and store them over the winters (as recommended). Every year, more and more come up. I now have three to four dozen along one side of the veggie garden. Secretly, I have my fingers crossed that they will take over the whole garden one day so all I will have to do it pick blossoms and make jewelry.